US considering decommissioning nuclear-powered aircraft carriers

US considering decommissioning nuclear-powered aircraft carriers
The United States is again considering decommissioning the USS Truman aircraft carrier in an effort to reduce military spending in the new fiscal year. In 2019, the U.S. government had planned to retire the ship to save money, but the Truman was successfully budgeted for. Now the familiar operation is back.

According to a report on the website of the U.S. Naval Academy on March 10, the Pentagon chief is budgeting for the military in the 2022 fiscal year, Biden’s first year as president. The new annual military spending is set at $7,080, a significant reduction from the $721.5 billion in fiscal 2020, as the Defense Department weighs how to reduce spending. According to the sources, the new spending may lead to the US military cut feet. The US military plans to reduce the strength of its carrier force by reducing the number of aircraft carriers to fit the Fiscal Year 2022 budget as its military budget falls.

The idea of taking the carrier out of service again was floated on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. Rob Wittman, a Republican member of the House of Representatives, asked Admiral Philip Davidson about decommissioning the USS Truman before it is overhauled. The current head of the US Indo-Pacific Command, in response to a query, said that US aircraft carriers were key and were being deployed under the pressure of last year. He believes that the US military has no ability to replace the existence of aircraft carriers. The US military has a need for aircraft carriers for all battles, and it is vital to maintain the operational capability of the aircraft carrier forces. He stressed that the United States has existing laws that guarantee the number of aircraft carriers in service. Davidson has previously said that the U.S. military is losing its military dominance in Asia and that China is clearly actively preparing for war. He believes China will resolve the Taiwan issue within six years.

The Pentagon has yet to confirm the size of the budget, with a range of $704bn – $708bn only rumoured. But according to Politico and Bloomberg, the Pentagon’s ongoing planning for the New Year’s military activities and deployments is actually operating under that assumption. The Department of Defense is looking at ways to save money and is reviewing its 2019 budget to clarify previous spending details so it can save money in the new fiscal year. The Navy reportedly intends to cut the USS Truman (CVN-75) out of the budget instead of undergoing interim maintenance and power system core replacement.

US considering decommissioning nuclear-powered aircraft carriers
This round of budget cuts also involves a review of the details of spending in the shipbuilding industry. Just last month, the US Naval Academy received a memo saying that the Pentagon is studying the cost details of shipbuilding and evaluating the Navy’s shipbuilding budget as part of a proposed comprehensive review of the Trump administration. While it’s not clear how much it costs the Navy to decommission an aircraft carrier, the Navy does realize the cost savings envisioned if it maintains fewer carriers.

The U. S. S. Truman, a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, joined the U. S. Atlantic fleet on July 25, 1998, at naval base in Norfolk, Virginia. When the ship was up for maintenance in 2019, the administration was looking to cut military spending, considering abandoning maintenance on the Truman and decommissioning the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. The United States government was considering funding to maintain the carrier, which could be used to start work on the third and fourth Ford class carriers, the USS Enterprise and USS Miller. The Truman had been in service for about 20 years at the time and had been deployed in hot spots such as the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf. The Navy says the Truman’s maintenance is essential, and even if it can buy a new carrier, it will still be necessary for current combat deployments. U.S. law also dictates the number of carriers. And keeping the ship in service would save $15 billion by 2023. The Truman was not decommissioned in 2019.