Academician Zhou Yulin, a mathematician, died

Academician Zhou Yulin, a mathematician, died
Zhou Yulin, an academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, a renowned mathematician and researcher at the China Academy of Engineering Physics, passed away in Beijing on March 2, 2021 at the age of 98. Zhou Yulin was born in Shanghai in February 1923. He graduated from Datong University in 1945. In 1954, he went to Moscow University to study abroad, majoring in nonlinear partial differential equations. In 1957, he received his associate degree in physical and mathematical sciences. After that, he returned to work in the Department of Mathematical Mechanics of Peking University. In 1960, he was assigned to participate in China’s theoretical research on nuclear weapons. He used to be the deputy director of the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics in Beijing, the member of the Science and Technology Committee of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, and the president and honorary president of the Chinese Society of Computational Mathematics. He was elected member (academician) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1991. Zhou Yulin was one of the early organizers and pioneers of mathematics research in China’s nuclear weapon design and made great contributions to the development of China’s nuclear weapon cause. In the field of nonlinear partial differential equations, he was one of the main pioneers in early China. Based on the practice of scientific computation, he established the method and theory of discrete functional analysis. He loves scientific research and his motherland even more. He changed his major direction several times in order to meet the needs of the country. He “chose to study partial differential equations for national construction, then worked on difference for national defense, and then went back to work on partial differential equations for the needs of national construction”. Some see it as sacrifice and devotion, but he sees it as a promotion: “I am honored that my country needs me. In fact, I always want to improve my understanding of mathematics from a broader perspective. That’s what drives me to change and to do the research.”