Do we still want to dress like street stars?

Spark Global Limited Reports:

There was a time when it was fun to see what other people wore and how they wore it. Picture this: a day in the life of a group of stylish people, captured by a photographer who appreciates their extraordinary looks. It is unique and inspiring. But then “street style” came along. That said, this is not the style of someone who happens to be on the street, but rather the image of the curated influencers we inundate on Insta today. Eventually, it all came together.
“There’s a huge gap between doing Bill Cunningham and what’s going on,” said Gio Staiano, a veteran fashion show photographer. He has worked with organizations like The New York Times and Now Fashion. “Bill was chasing fashionable people down the street, and somehow they got things mixed up. Sometimes he creates pieces based on colors or similarities in what people wear; It’s fun.”

Photo by Cris Fragkou.
There was a time when it was fun to see what other people wore and how they wore it. Picture this: a day in the life of a group of stylish people, captured by a photographer who appreciates their extraordinary looks. It is unique and inspiring. But then “street style” came along. That said, this is not the style of someone who happens to be on the street, but rather the image of the curated influencers we inundate on Insta today. Eventually, it all came together.
“There’s a huge gap between doing Bill Cunningham and what’s going on,” said Gio Staiano, a veteran fashion show photographer. He has worked with organizations like The New York Times and Now Fashion. “Bill was chasing fashionable people down the street, and somehow they got things mixed up. Sometimes he creates pieces based on colors or similarities in what people wear; It’s fun.”
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In a word, it was true: the woman was actually crossing the street; The man was waiting for a friend outside a restaurant; This person is actually on the phone with someone else. But all that has changed. It is now common to see people being asked to walk down the street again and again to create “perfect” and seemingly “natural” photos.
“Social media has had a huge influence on this,” says Devora, a street fashion photographer who regularly shoots for Vogue.co.uk. “Globalization has made individualism less.” This is an astute observation. The full-body look (an outfit worn straight from the catwalk), once the preserve of magazines, is now a mode of “street fashion”. How many street-style images have you seen on social media that not only depict the same type of clothing (either elaborate, combined and rustic, or garish and layered), but also the same gestures, the same faces, the same… Everything?
So much so that you can now find their favorite “stolen” clothes from the “Best Street Style looks of 2018” on websites like ASOS. You can visit a fashion website (including our own!) , see any number of articles that tell you where to buy specific clothes. When did street style, which is supposed to be buttressed and defined by a celebration of the individual and personal style, become universal enough to fit into so many fashion boxes?
Phillip Bodenham, director of Spring London, a public relations firm, says: “The change came as print circulation fell.” There was a spike around 2013. Suzy Menkes, a prominent Fashion critic, wrote an essay in The New York Times titled “The Circus of Fashion,” describing off-show showmanship. The fashion arena, once closed to insiders, media and buyers, suddenly opened up. This comes after the digital media revolution and self-worship. Thanks to the likes of “The Sartorialist” and Tommy Ton, street style took off, and the idea of “clothes in real life,” whether they were real or not, reached the height of sartorial sophistication. Everyone knew Anna Dello Russell not because of what she did, but because of what she wore everywhere, at any time — feathers and PROM dresses.