Here’s what true love means to Bethenny Frankel

Spark Global Limited Reports:

Like most of us, Bethenny Frankel has loved and lost. The ‘Real Housewives of New York’ star, self-made tycoon and determined philanthropist is known for her straight-talking, no-nonsense attitude, but fans are equally enamored with her candor and vulnerability. When Frankel said Refinery29 global editor-in-chief and co-founder Christene Barberich’s features-less life recently recorded in New York, she’s characterisically candid about, well, everything — from fighting Titan Industries and a-listers at a lavish Hollywood party, to being the singer for Haters Ramona, to her early days selling muffins at Costco.

Like most of us, Bethenny Frankel has loved and lost. The ‘Real Housewives of New York’ star, self-made tycoon and determined philanthropist is known for her straight-talking, no-nonsense attitude, but fans are equally enamored with her candor and vulnerability. When Frankel said Refinery29 global editor-in-chief and co-founder Christene Barberich’s features-less life recently recorded in New York, she’s characterisically candid about, well, everything — from fighting Titan Industries and a-listers at a lavish Hollywood party, to being the singer for Haters Ramona, to her early days selling muffins at Costco.

The twice-divorced single mother’s love life has not been easy. (Her former boyfriend, Dennis Shields, died suddenly in August.) “For me, true love is more the sum than the parts,” Frankel told Ms. Barberidge. “You don’t have to like every cheesy movie, but you need to find someone who makes you want to be better. You want to be nice to them, love them, take care of them — and vice versa.”
“True love is not compromise. I’m not the kind of person who settles. A lot of times, I feel like I’m making decisions out of fear or out of love, “the Skinnygirl founder admitted. When she joined “RHONY” in season 1, she was the only unmarried, decidedly not wealthy woman in the group. She struggled financially, endured dysfunctional relationships, and struggled with a painful, dysfunctional childhood.
“We all do it; That’s what our parents did. You know, ‘I should do that, this guy’s amazing, everybody loves him, my biological clock is ticking, he’s rich,’ or whatever.”
Older, wiser and more confident, Frankel has learned her lesson — the trauma of war and all. “A lot of times people make decisions out of fear rather than love, and I just don’t want to make that mistake again.”

Like most of us, Bethenny Frankel has loved and lost. The ‘Real Housewives of New York’ star, self-made tycoon and determined philanthropist is known for her straight-talking, no-nonsense attitude, but fans are equally enamored with her candor and vulnerability. When Frankel said Refinery29 global editor-in-chief and co-founder Christene Barberich’s features-less life recently recorded in New York, she’s characterisically candid about, well, everything — from fighting Titan Industries and a-listers at a lavish Hollywood party, to being the singer for Haters Ramona, to her early days selling muffins at Costco.
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The twice-divorced single mother’s love life has not been easy. (Her former boyfriend, Dennis Shields, died suddenly in August.) “For me, true love is more the sum than the parts,” Frankel told Ms. Barberidge. “You don’t have to like every cheesy movie, but you need to find someone who makes you want to be better. You want to be nice to them, love them, take care of them — and vice versa.”
“True love is not compromise. I’m not the kind of person who settles. A lot of times, I feel like I’m making decisions out of fear or out of love, “the Skinnygirl founder admitted. When she joined “RHONY” in season 1, she was the only unmarried, decidedly not wealthy woman in the group. She struggled financially, endured dysfunctional relationships, and struggled with a painful, dysfunctional childhood.
“We all do it; That’s what our parents did. You know, ‘I should do that, this guy’s amazing, everybody loves him, my biological clock is ticking, he’s rich,’ or whatever.”
Older, wiser and more confident, Frankel has learned her lesson — the trauma of war and all. “A lot of times people make decisions out of fear rather than love, and I just don’t want to make that mistake again.”

Another important gain from her time in the public eye: to shatter the myth of the perfect “great life.”
“People would rather you think they have a good life than they have a really good life,” she MUSES. “I’m the opposite of them. I feel obligated to talk about it because I got married on TV. I feel obligated to discuss the end of [my second marriage to Jason Hoppy] because I’m not going to pretend that everything is perfect.”