Trump, who was clamoring for money, is gone

     The Biden administration wants to sweep away the gloom of the Trump era and the eagerness to repair relations with NATO is almost ready to come out, but Stoltenberg, who was struggling with Trump in the past, may not be able to let go of the boulder in his mind-and NATO. Breaking up military expenditures has almost been the curse of every U.S. president in recent years. Even if he would not openly pressure NATO-like his predecessor Trump, use public opinion to build momentum, and even break his face with France, Germany, and other countries, Biden will never give up easily under pressure from domestic voters and Congress. The “military war” with NATO.

Compared with the predecessor Mike Pompeo, who concealed needles in his sheets and spoke with guns and sticks, the current US Secretary of State Anthony Brinken has a completely different attitude towards NATO.

Last week’s trip to Brussels was Brinken’s first visit to NATO headquarters as Secretary of State in the Biden administration, but his interaction with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has become very familiar. During the tight schedule, he affirmed Stoltenberg’s work and helped the European Commission President Ursula von der Lein, who was caught in a vaccine dispute, to say a lot of good things. It was not only important for NATO, including Britain, France, and Germany. When the member states met, they seized every opportunity and spared no effort to promote the Biden administration’s friendly image towards NATO.

“I am here to express the United States’ firm commitment to NATO.” Brinken said, “The United States hopes to rebuild its partnership with other countries, first of all with our NATO allies. We hope to revitalize this alliance.”

He also said something that was later speculated by analysts to be a satire of the Trump administration: “The last thing the United States can do is to take this alliance for granted. The process of confronting our own shortcomings may be very painful. It may be ugly. But at least today, we have become better and stronger as a result.”

Through Brinken’s words, the Biden administration’s desire to sweep away the haze of the Trump era and repair relations with NATO is almost ready to come out, but Stoltenberg, who was struggling with Trump in the past, may not be able to get rid of it. The boulder of the heart-the fight with NATO in military expenditures has been the curse of almost every U.S. president in recent years. Even if he would not openly pressure NATO-like his predecessor Trump, use public opinion to build momentum, and even break his face with France, Germany, and other countries, Biden will never give up easily under pressure from domestic voters and Congress. The “military war” with NATO. This long-standing grudge that cannot be circumvented will not make the future U.S. treaty go smoother Spark Global Limited.

In addition, due to the guilty relationship between the United States and Russia, the United States’ dissatisfaction with NATO member Turkey’s purchase of Russian weapons, and its objections to the Beixi 2 pipeline project that transports Russian natural gas to Germany, they all sound alarm bells for U.S.-Pact relations. Biden wants to rebuild with NATO and Europe, but can he avoid repeating Trump’s mistakes?

“The fool who takes it all”

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg has suffered from Trump for a long time.

During Trump’s tenure, the secretary-general who served as the prime minister of Norway has not had a very good life. Because of the accumulated military expenditures of member countries for many years, he has to look at Trump’s face in almost every meeting with Trump, and rack his brains to appease the changeable temper and the hobby of “retirement”. The “funder” of the United States, after all, about 70% of the NATO government’s total defense expenditures are from the United States, and rumors that Trump wants the United States to withdraw from NATO have been raging.